Tag Archives: Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance

StanTogether pushing hiring surge by mid-summer

Central Valley Business Journal, March 2012

By KEITH MICHAUD/Business Journal Editor

MODESTO – Economic development officials in Stanislaus County are nudging local businesses into doing something they already want to do – hire just one more person.

Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance’s StanTogether campaign has a lofty goal: 1,000 new jobs in Stanislaus County between now and July 31. Each new job means a new paycheck that can go to paying for local services and products, and generating sales taxes and other fees. That fuels a need for even more hiring.

“It’s a snowball effect,” said Craig Lewis, president of Prudential California Reality of the Central Valley and a member of the Alliance board. He said that for every dollar invested in the local economy another $3.50 is generated, growing that snowball even larger.

Consumer confidence is a big part, said Lewis, because once consumers see that people are being hired there will be more spending rather than saving, which will spur on the economy even more.

“Consumer confidence is huge,” said Lewis. “It shows business owners to have a little bit of faith in the future.”

StanTogether is the focused effort to create synergy throughout the Stanislaus County business community, said Lewis, and more.

“The other thing that I liked about it is that it said ‘We’re going to be bold. We’re going to set high goals,’” said Lewis. And communities rally around such optimistic efforts, he said.

Alliance officials have reason to be confident that they will meet the mark and then some. In just the first few weeks of the campaign 47 businesses are participating, 52 people have been hired, and 144 openings are waiting to billed, said Alisha Cruz, Alliance marketing intern working on the project.

“What we’re hoping to get across is that there are some businesses that need just a little push to make that hire,” said Cruz.

Teri Adams-Jones, the Alliance’s communications marketing manager, said businesses receive a variety of incentives for participating in the program and its location may be the basis for one such incentive.

“The businesses address may qualify them for possible hiring tax credits,” said Adams-Jones, referring to the Stanislaus County enterprise zone. “The hiring tax credit is a total value over a five-year period of $37,440 per qualified employee.”

Cruz said participating businesses also get other incentives – business logos go on the StanTogether website with a link to the business’s website, advertising on the website, recognition on Kat County radio and a community page, a decal to display in their business to show that they are participating in a program to meet the 1,000 jobs goal, and some companies that hire a veteran may be eligible for on-the-job training expenses reimbursement.

There’s even a YouTube presentation to explain the importance of 1,000 jobs and 1,000 paychecks.

“We want businesses to know they’re not alone,” said Adams-Jones. “We know that there are some businesses that have been wanting to hire someone, but just haven’t been willing to.”

Ian Norris of Norris Construction heard about the program on the news and thought it would be the best way to connect with qualified, skilled workers.

“I’m an employer and I know there are lots of people out there looking for work,” said Norris. “The problem is finding the right person.”

Norris has not hired anyone yet, but is optimistic that he will. Business has been picking up recently and, with seven bids on his desk right now, he wanted to hire crews to take on the projects rather than refuse a project simply because he did not have full crews.

“There’s work coming in every day,” Norris said. “I felt this coming on for quite a while. … I’m in this for the long haul and I’m very optimistic.”

Another thing that appealed to Norris about the Alliance’s program is the focus on finding work for return military veterans.

“That would be awesome,” said Norris, who added that being able to hire a veteran would be “very gratifying.”

There’s more information about the program on the StanTogether website – http://stantogether.com/. Interested Stanislaus County businesses can contact the campaign by calling the Alliance at 209-567-4985.

Contact the author about this and other stories at kmichaud@cvbizjournal.com.

 

Web-first version: Campaign goal to find 1,000 new jobs and 1,000 paychecks by July 31

Central Valley Business Journal, February 2012

By KEITH MICHAUD/Business Journal Editor

MODESTO – Economic development officials in Stanislaus County are nudging local businesses into doing something they already want to do – hire just one more person.

Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance’s StanTogether campaign has a lofty goal: 1,000 new jobs in Stanislaus County between now and July 31. Each new job means a new paycheck that can go to paying for local services and products that in turn causes a need for filling even more jobs.

Alliance officials have reason to be confident that they will meet the mark and then some. Already 70 new jobs have been listed and filled, said Alisha Cruz, Alliance marketing intern working on the project.

“What we’re hoping to get across is that there are some businesses that need just a little push to make that hire,” said Cruz.

Teri Adams-Jones said businesses receive a variety of incentives for participating in the program and a business’ location may be the basis for one such incentive.

“The businesses address may qualify them for possible hiring tax credits,” said Adams-Jones, referring to enterprise zone incentives. “The hiring tax credit is a total value over a five-year period of $37,440 per qualified employee.”

There are also on-the-job-training reimbursement incentives when a business hires a military service veteran.

Cruz said participating businesses also get bonus incentives – business logos go on the StanTogether website with a link to the business’ website, advertising on the website, recognition on Kat County radio and a community page, and a decal to display in their business to show that they are participating in a program to meet the 1,000 jobs goal. There’s even a YouTube presentation to explain the importance of 1,000 jobs and 1,000 pay checks.

“We want businesses to know they’re not alone,” said Adams-Jones. “We know that there are some businesses that have been wanting to hire someone, but just haven’t been willing to.”

There’s more information about the program on the StanTogether website. Interested Stanislaus County businesses can contact the campaign by calling the Alliance at 209-567-4985.

To read more about StanTogether, pick up the March edition of the Central Valley Business Journal or visit the website at www.cvbizjournal.com.

Contact the author about this and other stories at kmichaud@cvbizjournal.com.

 

Web only version: ‘Project X’ proves ‘mega sites’ vital part of economic mix

Central Valley Business Journal, February 2012

By KEITH MICHAUD/Business Journal Editor

The mystery – and hope – emanating from what was dubbed “Project X” in Patterson has splayed open just how very important it is to a regional economy to have available commercial real estate offerings.

So-called “mega sites” or “super sites” – arguably 100 acres and larger with a broad variety of “shovel ready” features – are home to distribution centers, food-processing plants, logistics centers, and, as in the case of Project X, a “fulfillment center.”

“It’s important to have those sites to be able to take advantage of those situations when they come around,” said Ryan Swehla, principal at NAI Benchmark in Modesto, which handles commercial real estate in San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties. “But they don’t happen very often.”

A distribution center or food-processing plant on a large commercial site can be a “huge jobs provider,” said Swehla.

“That project will be a boon to the area, especially when you see what’s happing with Patterson Vegetables,” said Swehla, referring to the food processing plant in Patterson that had announced it was planning to close, potentially leaving nearly 500 without jobs. “It’s just a godsend.”

Michael Ammann, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit San Joaquin Partnership, is not alone when he pushes the development of mega sites.

“This is a competitive advantage that can allow San Joaquin County to diversify its economy with new jobs developed through the attraction of technology devices, software development, and advance manufacturing co‐located with other supply chain partners,” said Ammann.

“For the past 10 years San Joaquin Valley’s eight counties have consistently had double-digit unemployment rates and today San Joaquin County is still at 15.5 percent,” he said. “We need to do something different to solve this structural unemployment problem that increases social costs, crime, and a drag on the overall economy often ranking our communities low in quality of life nationally. … Mega sites create the opportunity to attract large growing corporate projects.”

“Most of the counties in the Central Valley have a few shovel ready sites and a few more that are in the process of being developed,” said William Bassitt, chief executive officer of the Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance. “There is not an abundance of available industrial or business park land identified in the valley, probably in part to the reluctance to sacrifice valuable ag land for job.

“Unfortunately, no progress can be made in overcoming the economic doldrums and the unemployment quandary we are experiencing in the valley without the availability of employment opportunities for the residents,” he said. “And to create those opportunities, ready-to-go business sites must be available.”

Having those large commercial sites ready-to-go or “shovel ready” is key.

“These types of sites are important because they indicate the relative sophistication that a community has in understanding what is needed to be competitive in economic development,” said Bassitt.

Patterson, future home of the still mysterious Project X, is one of those communities.

“Communities that realize this and have set aside land for the purposes of job development will capture the attention of businesses looking to relocate or expand and provide employment,” said Bassitt. “Patterson is a community that glimpsed at the future and prepared for it with the development of Keystone and West Ridge business parks. Stanislaus County is also trying to prepare for opportunities as they work with Gerry Kamilos to develop a 2,500-acre business park site called West Park just south of Patterson. Site selectors and real estate brokers prefer dealing with organized parks with adequate land assembly, fully served, fairly priced and appropriately located for their clients’ needs.”

Having ready sites makes marketing a community much easier than trying to convince a company to relocate to a community or expand when there is no ready space, said Bassitt.

“Project X is an example of taking advantage of a community’s state of readiness and having adequate land ready to go,” said Bassitt. “The project will undoubtedly attract national and maybe even international attention and, if successfully completed, it will have been because the community of Patterson had the sites and was ready.”

“Prospects want ‘shovel ready’ or a detail plan and timeframe showing a pathway to entitlement, which includes interstate highways, airports, port, intermodal from truck to train and major power grid and other infrastructure in water, sewer and natural gas,” said Ammann.

The Central Valley is uniquely suited for that, said Ammann, because of Interstate 5, state Highway 99 and assess to east-west highways, two major intermodal yards operated by two national railroads – Union Pacific and Burlington National and Santa Fe – and assorted short lines, an airport Ammann has called as-yet underutilized, and the Port of Stockton that is in the process of installing huge cranes for its expansion that will allow container service and a connection to the Port of Oakland.

The Port of Stockton in July 2000 acquired Rough and Ready Island from the U.S. Navy.

“The Port has invested time and infrastructure into this property for large businesses in need of immediately access to port, rail and truck,” said Ammann. “Currently, there is approximately 200 acres available for development. In addition, the Stockton Metropolitan Airport has 550‐acres being developed as Airpark 599. This industrial park offers immediate access for corporate offices, delivery of air freight, and related air maintenance operations.

“These two sites and logistical assets tied together with the unique advantage of two intermodal truck-to-rail services,” said Ammann, “San Joaquin County can be sold as an international center of commerce in northern California’s ‘mega region’ of over 12.5 million consumers located in the Bay Area, Sacramento and Central Valley.”

And that consumer base is going to grow significantly over the next 40 years. Ammann pointed to state Department of Finance numbers – the population in the Bay Area will grow from just under 7.4 million people to nearly 10.3 million by 2050. The Central Valley region from Sutter and Yuba counties to Kern County will grow from 6.6 million people to 13.5 million people. And the northern Central Valley will grow from about 542,100 people to 1 million.

And having a workforce that is trained and ready to work is important, too.

“Workforce is always the question,” said Swehla. “Workforce is definitely a driving factor.”

Other factors include capacity and utilities – electricity, sewer and water. Those factors differ slightly depending on the industry, said Swehla. A food processor might need ample water supply and a larger sewer capacity than, say, a distribution center. Distribution centers need workers, but not as much when it comes to utilities.

But there is a common feature.

“You have to be near a major freeway,” said Swehla.

Having all these features are vital for a community trying to lure a job-generating business to one of its mega sites, said Swehla, but often it can come down to how a business is treated when it arrives to scout out a community. He said some communities still fail to see the economic boost such a business can bring and instead bog down a prospective commercial development with paperwork and regulations rather than trying to streamline the process.

Swehla praised Ammann and Bassitt’s organizations for providing necessary services that help streamline the process and help to showcase commercial real estate opportunities.

“They are tremendous help,” said Swehla.

Contact the author about this and other stories at kmichaud@cvbizjournal.com.

 

‘Project X’ remains a mystery

Central Valley Business Journal, February 2012

By KEITH MICHAUD/Business Journal Editor

PATTERSON – The huge hush-hush commercial development in Patterson dubbed “Project X” remained a mystery going into February.

The secrecy surrounding just what company was moving to the west Stanislaus County community just off Interstate 5 had many throughout the region speculating. After all, a company big and stable enough to bring in 1,500 full-time jobs and another 1,000 or more seasonal jobs for a “fulfillment” center truly would be a godsend for a county with an unemployment rate of 16.1 percent for December.

Many of the rumors claimed it was e-commerce giant Amazon.com. Still other rumors claimed either Target or J.C. Penney was bringing in a distribution center.

Patterson in recent years has become a logistics hub, according to the “Transportation and Logistics Industry Cluster Report” by the Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance, because of available land, access to Interstate 5 and railroad lines, proximity to the Bay Area, and competitive wages and electricity costs. CVS, Kohl’s, W.W. Grainger, and others have distribution centers in Patterson.

Patterson City Council members were to be briefed about the incoming business on Jan. 11, but the meeting was abruptly postponed, supposedly so that the parties involved in the deal could iron out details and escrow could close before going public.

“Seefried, as the representative for the investors that will be the property owners, is close to closing escrow on the property and starting construction on the Project X site,” Patterson City Manager Rod Butler wrote in an agenda report for that special meeting. He was referring to Atlanta-based Seefried Industrial Properties, which specializes in development, leasing, and property management of industrial real estate and has developed distribution sites for Amazon.com in the past. Seefried contacted the city over the summer about two parcels in the Westridge Business Park, wrote Butler.

State legislation signed in September adds fuel to the Amazon.com rumor since it received concessions on earlier state legislation that would force retailers such as Amazon.com to collect sales tax. Amazon.com and other retailers were given more time before they had to collect the sales tax by pledging to create jobs. For Amazon.com, that meant pledging to create at least 10,000 full-time jobs and hire 25,000 seasonal employees by the end of 2015. It also dropped a referendum bid to overturn the earlier legislation.

“A prolonged, costly ballot battle is a benefit to no one,” Gov. Jerry Brown said in signing the bill “This landmark legislation not only levels the playing field between online retailers and California’s brick-and-mortar businesses, it will also create tens of thousands of jobs and inject hundreds of millions of dollars back into critical services like education and public safety in future years. It’s time for Washington to follow our lead and forge a bipartisan national solution.”

Online sales tax collection in California will begin Sept. 15 if Congress fails to act on nationwide legislation.

The state Board of Equalization has estimated that California loses more than $1 billion annually from uncollected use taxes. The analysis also shows that the state loses at least $83 million each year in uncollected state and local use tax attributed to Amazon’s sales in California.

Amazon.com’s net sales increased by 35 percent in the fourth quarter ending Dec. 31 to more than $17.4 billion compared to nearly $13 billion for the fourth quarter of 2010, according to the giant’s end-of-quarter report released Tuesday (Jan. 31).

Contact the author about this and other stories at kmichaud@cvbizjournal.com.